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Know the bag and size limits

This image shows the correct way to measure a brown trout. A straight line from the tip of the snout to the end of the centre of the rail fin
The correct way to measure a trout.

Our inland fisheries are amongst the best trout fisheries available in the world.

Over the first couple of weeks of this season, we have become aware that some anglers are not following size and bag limits. Of particular concern is

  • taking undersized fish
  • exceeding bag limit, and
  • exceeding the number of fish permitted over 500 mm.

The Inland Fishing Code supplied each year with your licence is a great pocket reference to keep in your tackle box. The regulations are readily available on our website, the InFish App and on signage at major angling waters around the state.

If our Fisheries Officers discover anglers not following these regulations, it will result in an infringement notice and fine of $163. We may also seize the fish.

It is your responsibility to know the correct way to measure your catch and to know the size and bag limits for where you fish.

You should have something to measure your catch with you when fishing. If in doubt, we recommend that you put the fish back.

The correct way of measuring trout is fork length. This means in a straight line from the tip of the snout to the end of the centre of the tail fin. This is different to bream and other estuarine/marine fish that are measured from the tip of the snout to the tip of the tail. The photo with this story shows the correct way to measure fork length.

Be very careful with how you handle fish before release. We often hear “I kept the fish because it was gut hooked and it wasn’t going to survive”. Our regulations clearly state that you cannot be in possession of any undersized trout at our waters. Undersized fish MUST be released, even if they do not survive. We cannot be any clearer about this - you must not possess them.

If the hook is a long way down the fish’s throat, the best way is to simply cut the line and leave the hook. Fish in this instance will generally survive if handled gently and released. Never touch the gills of a fish that you intend to release as it greatly decreases their chances of survival.

We manage our fisheries in line with objectives in the Tasmanian Inland Recreational Fishery Management Plan 2018 – 2028. We tailor our management to the individual needs of each fishery. Bag and size limits manage the total harvest and protect the breeding stock. Please follow the regulations and do your part in protecting our fishery for everyone to enjoy well into the future.

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